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ANZAC Day 2015 Centenary Commemoration in Manila – 25 April 2015

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(Left to Right) Colonel Bruce Murray, AM, Defence Attache to the Republic of the Philippines and H.E. Bill Tweddell, Australian Ambassador to the Philippines

Last Thursday, 16th April 2015, a media briefing was held at the Australian Embassy Manila where H.E. Bill Tweddell, Australian Ambassador to the Philippines and Colonel Bruce Murray AM, Defence Attache to the Republic of the Philippines, announced the events that will take place here in Manila in celebration of the Centenary of Anzac. Expatch was there to cover the event along with other TV and newspaper reporters. Here are the details of the announcement.

 

Write the author.

 

Australian Embassy Media Briefing

16 April 2015, 11:00 AM – Australia Center, Australian Embassy Manila

 

Key Themes

  • For many Australians, the Anzac Centenary will be one of the most significant national commemorations to take place during their lifetime. From the grinding hardships and sacrifices of the Gallipoli campaign, beginning with the 25 April pre-dawn landing, emerged a distinctly Australian identity characterised by courage, endurance, tenacity, resilience, selfishness and mateship.

  • Anzac Day gives rise to a similar spirit of pride and nationalism experienced during the Philippines “Araw ng Kagitingan” or Day of Valour on 9 April, commemorating the greatness of Filipino fighters during World War II who gave all that was humanly possible, and beyond that, for the defence of Bataan and the sanctity of freedom.

  • The Australian Defence Force has a rich history of service to the nation and continues to honour the Anzac spirit. The period from August 2014 to Remembrance Day 2018 will also encompass a number of historical milestones on Australia’s involvement in conflicts including anniversary events in World War I, World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. On 5 July, we will mark the 70th anniversary of the Liberation of the Philippines that involved more than 4,000 Australian sailors, soldiers and airmen, 92 of whom lost their lives in the liberation of this country.

  • It is the Anzac spirit of “mateship” that also underpins and fuels the deep-rooted and broad-based relationship between Australia and the Philippines, a shared value similarly manifested in the Filipino concept of “bayanihan”.

 

ANZACDay

 

About the Centenary of Anzac

  • The Centenary of Anzac is a very special time for all Australians and will be one of the most significant national commemorations to take place in our lifetimes.

    • The first Anzacs helped forge our national identity and define our national character. They left a strong and enduring legacy.

    • During the Anzac Centenary we will remember not only the original Anzacs who served the Gallipoli and the Western Front, but also the Australian way of life that the Anzacs fostered and protected.

    • The Centenary of Anzac commemorates one hundred years of service and sacrifice by Australian servicemen and women.

  • The Centenary of Anzac programme will encompass many of the wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations in which Australians have been involved since 1914.

    • The Centenary of Anzac provided all Australians with an opportunity to remember and reflect upon the service and sacrifice of more than 102,000 who have given their lives in service to our nation.

    • The Centenary of Anzac will also commemorate other historical milestones of other conflicts involving Australians, including:

      • 75th anniversary of events in World War II

      • 65th anniversary of events in Korean War

      • 50th anniversary events in the Vietnam War.

    • To commemorate the 70th anniversary of Australia’s contribution to the Liberation of the Philippines, a memorial marker was unveiled at Palo Leyte on 19 October 2014 dedicated to the more than four thousand Australian servicemen who fought for the Liberation of the Philippines, including 92 who did not return.

    • On 23 April 2015, a memorial marker will be placed on Bataan Peninsula dedicated to the nine crew of a Royal Australian Air Force Catalina that disappeared over Manila Bay 70 years ago during WWII. Family members of the crew will attend the ceremony.

  • The Australian Defence Force has a rich and proud history of service.

    • The commemoration period offers appropriate reflection of our military history, and its influence upon our culture, ethos, values and traditions.

    • Anzac Day is a commemoration of service and sacrifice. We remember the sacrifices of our service men and women, not to glorify war but to acknowledge their contribution to our nation and to remind us of the cost of peace and freedom.

  • Anzac Day is a day for all Australians; a time to remember those who have paid the ultimate price in service to our nation.

    • The first Anzacs helped forge Australia’s national identity and define our national character. They created a distinctly Australian identity characterised by courage, endurance, tenacity, resilience, selflessness and mateship.

    • During the Anzac Centenary we will remember not only the original Anzacs who served at Gallipoli and the Western Front, but also commemorate more than a century of service by Australian servicemen and women.

 

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About the Gallipoli Campaign

  • The Gallipoli Campaign took place on the Gallipoli peninsula in the Ottoman Empire between 25 April 1915 and 9 January 1916. The peninsula forms the northern bank of the Dardanelles, a strait that provides a sea route to what was then the Russian Empire, one of the Allied powers during WWI. Intending to secure it, Russia’s allies Britain and France launched a naval attack followed by an amphibious landing on the peninsula with the eventual aim of capturing the Ottoman capital of Constantinople (modern-day Istanbul).

  • The naval attack was repelled and, after eight months’ fighting, with many casualties on both sides, the land campaign also failed and the invasion force was withdrawn to Egypt.

  • The campaign was one the greatest Ottoman victories during the war and a major Allied failure. In Turkey, it was regarded as a defining moment in the nation’s history: a final surge in the defence of the motherland as the Ottoman Empire crumbled. The struggle formed the basis of the Turkish War of Independence and the declaration of the Republic of Turkey eight years later.

  • The campaign is often considered as marking the birth of national consciousness in Australia and New Zealand and the date of the landing, 25 April, is known as “Anzac Day” which is the most significant commemoration of military casualties and veterans in those two centuries, surpassing Remembrance Day (Armistice Day).

 

Joint Media Release

ANZAC Day 2015 Centenary Commemoration in Manila – 25 April 2015

 

On Saturday, 25 April 2015, the Australian and New Zealand Embassies in Manila will jointly host the Centenary of ANZAC Day Dawn Service ceremony at the “Libingan ng mga Bayani” (Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers), Fort Bonifacio, Makati City, Metro Manila. The Dawn Service will commence at 5:30am.

 

ANZAC Day marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand Forces during the First World War. Anzac’s is the name given to the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps who landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey early on the morning of 25 April 1915.

 

“The Gallipoli landing and subsequent battles which took place a century ago at what is now known as Anzac Cove was a defining moment for Australia and New Zealand. The courage, resilience and mateship shown by the first Anzacs has had a lasting influence on our national character, and what has become known as the ‘Anzac spirit’ has become an essential element of our national identity. Indeed, ANZAC Day now commemorates the service and sacrifice of our service men and women across all wars and peacekeeping operations,” said Australian Ambassador Bill Tweddell.

 

The ANZAC Day Dawn Service at “Libingan ng mga Bayani” is attended by members of the Australian and New Zealand communities, the Turkish Ambassador, representatives of the British, French, and Indian Armed Forces, who also participated in the Allied Forces Dardanelles Campaign, as well as our partners from the Philippine Armed Forces, Police and other government offices. The Service is also open to all members of the public who wish to acknowledge the fallen of Australia and New Zealand.

 

“As we commemorate a seminal time in our nationhood and ponder the loss of many thousands of cherished sons of Australia, New Zealand and Turkey we should reflect on the horrors of war and the enormously destructive forces of nationalism and militarism which sadly are all too common today. For Australia and New Zealand, Gallipoli was the gateway to nationhood. The ANZAC spirit lives on today as we seek to forge a just international order that respects democracy, human rights, religious tolerance and peaceful means of conflict resolution,” said New Zealand Ambassador David Strachan.

 

Individuals or representatives of organisations who wish to lay a wreath are welcome to do so at the appropriate moment during the ceremony. Attendees are encouraged to wear medals; personal medals should be worn on the left breast; medals of family members should be worn on the right breast. The ceremony will commence at 05:30 am and attendees should arrive at the venue no later than than 5:15 am.

 

A traditional ‘gunfire breakfast’ will be available following the ceremony.

 

For more information, kindly visit www.philippines.embassy.gov.au or www.nzembassy.com/philippines.

 

Media Enquiries:

Australian Embassy Public Affairs (02) 757-8173 – Mr. JP Agcaoili  |  Fax (02) 757-8323

Email: Public-Affairs-MNLA@dfat.gov.au  |  www.philippines.embassy.gov.au  |  www.facbook.com/AustralianEmbassyManila

 

2015 Anzac Day Centenary Dawn Service

 

The Australian and New Zealand embassies will jointly host the Centenary Anzac Day dawn service commemoration in Manila. This will be held on Saturday, 25 April 2015 at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers (“Libingan ng mga Bayani”) in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City, Manila, starting at 5:30am.

 

The commemoration provides an opportunity for reverent reflection on the ‘Spirit of Anzac” epitomised during the Gallipoli campaign, which is so much a part of the ethos and heritage of both Australia and New Zealand. The service will honour the sacrifice of those Australians and New Zealanders who lost their lives in time of war and in the cause of peace.

 

The Anzac Day ceremony is attended mostly by the Australian and New Zealand communities, but is open to anyone else who wishes to remember the fallen of those two countries.

 

Anyone attending the event is welcome to lay a wreath, although there is no obligation to do so. This is normally done by organisations with a particular association with Australia or New Zealand. People wishing to lay a wreath should make their own arrangements – a range of wreaths suitable for Anzac Day are available from Jamaica’s Floral Design (telephone 843-5821, 844-7676 or 0920-548-0109).

 

People attending are encouraged to wear medals. Personal medals should be worn on the left breast; medals of family members should be worn on the right breast.

 

If you are attending the commemoration please arrive by 5:15 am to allow a prompt start. A ‘gunfire breakfast’ will be available following the ceremony.

 

Red-Poppy

Click here for the location map:

 

map_libingan

 

 

Author: Marcelle Villegas 

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Photo source:

Top photo – by Kenneth de Guzman for Expatch

Anzac Day – http://www.dubbo.com.au/events-calendar/anzac-day

Hat and poppies – http://www.woolwichpierhotel.com.au/anzac-day-at-the-pier/

 

 

 

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